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Endangered species

See them, before they become extinct. Endangered species

Endangered species

The lovers of traveling and discovering the underwater world usually have a list of sites they would like to see. In the depths of the seas and oceans there are still a number of uncovered areas. Caves and historical wrecks are just a little part of all the interesting things you can see under water such as hawksbill sea turtle, monk seal, hammerhead shark, angel shark and manatees. It is worth to take interest in all these rare animal species that are threatened with extinction. Here are some endangered species:

Hawksbill sea turtle

Hawksbill sea turtle
Hawksbill sea turtle (scubafish.com)

From among 7 species of sea turtles as many as 6 are considered to be endangered. One of them is the hawksbill sea turtle that occupies tropical reefs of 3 oceans: the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean. Its favorite food is sponges, fish and jellyfish.
Males of these sea turtles spend their whole life underwater but females go out to the shore to build a nest and lay eggs.

Where can you meet it? The Caribbeans, Cuba, Cape of Good Hope, Madagascar, Philippines

 Monk seal

Monk seal
Monk seal (mmc.gov)

Small populations of this lovable seal inhabit the Mediterranean Sea and Hawaiian regions. Unfortunately, due to hunting and human activity the monk seal is now considered endangered. In 2015 the population of this species was less than 2,000 individuals.

Where can you meet it? Greece, Turkey, Hawaii, Madeira

 

Hammerhead shark

Hammerhead shark
Hammerhead shark (jollydiver.com)

The hammerhead shark, whose proper name is smooth hammerhead, is so named for the characteristic shape of its head — flattened and laterally extended. Opposite to its tropical relatives, it usually occupies not very deep waters — less than 20 m deep. Most often, specimens of this species are fished for their fins which are used as an ingredient in Asian cuisine.

Where can you meet it? The Galápagos Islands, Egypt, The Bahamas, The Cocos Islands, Indonesia

Angelshark

Angelshark
Angelshark (aqua-marina.com)

Its other name is monkfish. This fish has been classified as critically endangered. In the past, the angelshark was seen in the waters stretching from the Mediterranean Sea up to the Norwegian Sea. Now they are hardly seen in any other place than the Canary Islands.

Where can you meet it? The Canary Islands

 

West Indian manatee

West Indian manatee
West Indian manatee (jollydiver.com)

Manatees are the sea relatives of elephants, hence their fair size — their body length ranges from 2.5 to 4.5 m. In extreme cases they reach even 1,500 kg of weight. This species occupies warm waters of tropical or subtropical zones. It is of a gentle nature and its diet mostly consists in plants. It feeds on algae and seagrass, and sometimes also on small crustaceans. The world population of the manatee is today estimated at 6,000 specimens.

Where can you meet it? Florida

Łukasz Głowacki

I’ve been diving for almost 10 years. The underwater world won my heart quite quickly. From the very beginning I wanted to be a good diver and partner, so I kept practising until I got a Master Scuba Diver PADI degree. I dive in hot and cold waters around the world. The thing I like most about diving is the sense of weightlessness and possibility to dive in the depths. I’m not too demanding when it comes to the landscapes, although I do enjoy their diversity, so I like diving in different places and conditions.

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